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Interpreting

Interpreting

Interpreting is simultaneous listening, thinking and talking. Interpreting is therefore a highly intensive activity and requires a rock-solid memory, speed and flexibility. Not to mention a good command of at least two languages and knowledge of the subject matter.

There are different types of interpreters. Which type is most suitable for you depends on the situation. We will gladly advise you.

Some of our activities

  • Execution of delivery and mortgage deeds at civil-law notaries

  • Execution of marriage certificates, cohabitation contracts or business contracts

  • International meetings

  • Guided tours of companies

  • Lawsuits and hearings for law firms

  • Courses with foreign participants

Simultaneous interpreting

Simultaneous interpretation means that the interpreter interprets almost simultaneously with the speaker. The interpreter sits in an interpreting booth so they can fully concentrate on the spoken word. A minimum of one interpreter is required for each language combination. For meetings lasting more than 45 to 60 minutes, two interpreters per language are required. Simultaneous interpretation is ideal for conferences and meetings with a large number of participants. The participants can follow the translation via their headphones, which they can set to the desired language.

Whispered interpretation

Whispered interpretation is similar to simultaneous interpreting. However, the interpreter does not use an interpreting booth, but sits in the same room as the participants. The interpreter is close to the person or persons who need the translation. A separate interpreter is required for each language combination. In most cases, providing that there are sufficient breaks, one interpreter per language combination will suffice, even for a longer period of time. Whispered interpretation is only suitable for small groups and short meetings where only a few attendees do not understand the main language.

Consecutive interpreting

Consecutive interpreting means that the interpreter reproduces a summary of what has been said in the source language for the target audience (without equipment). Because the interpretation takes place after the facts, there is a longer period of time between the speaker and the interpretation than with other forms of interpreting. A separate interpreter is required for each language combination. In most cases, providing that there are sufficient breaks, one interpreter per language combination will suffice, even for a longer period of time. Consecutive interpreting is suitable for small and large groups and a limited number of languages. Think for example of a lecture, board meeting, speech or wedding ceremony.

 

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